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Tan Yeow May

Tan Yeow May

I am a clinical psychologist with over 8 years of experience working with adolescents and adults across a variety of Government and Community settings in Western Australia and Singapore. This includes individuals within in- and out-patient hospitals, rehabilitation centres, and in prison settings.

I work primarily from dynamically oriented and attachment based approaches, where my focus is on addressing underlying issues that often mask as problematic symptoms.

I believe in the value of attending to core issues and the context with which one’s distress develops, lest they remain under- or unprocessed, creating other problems that can manifest in various ways later in life.

Please email me at: [email protected]

Profession

Clinical Psychologist

Specialities

ANXIETY AND PANIC DISORDERS
DEPRESSION
GENERAL RELATIONSHIP CHALLENGES (FAMILY, FRIENDS, CO-WORKERS)
TRAUMA AND POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD)
PERSONAL GROWTH AND SELF-ESTEEM
PERSONALITY DISORDERS
LIFE TRANSITIONS
MARRIAGE AND PARTNERSHIPS
PARENTING
GENERAL MENTAL HEALTH
WOMEN’S MENTAL HEALTH (PREGNANCY, INFERTILITY AND POST-PARTUM)
GRIEF AND LOSS
EATING DISORDERS AND BODY IMAGE
SELF-HARM AND SUICIDAL FEELINGS
BIPOLAR DISORDER
SCHIZOPHRENIA & PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS

Finances

Training

D.Psych (Clinical)
One-year program in relational studies (New York)
Schema (L1)

What kinds of treatment or therapy do you provide?

  • Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT)
  • Interpersonal Therapy
  • Psychodynamic Therapy
  • Emotion-focused Therapy (EFT)
  • Mindfulness-based Therapy
  • Schema Therapy (ST)

What language can you conduct the session in?

English and Chinese

What was your path to becoming a therapist?

By accident or not, I chose psychology in university because the subject I was initially interested in was unavailable. Throughout the course of study, I had the privilege to interact with individuals recovering from bipolar disorder, and this sparked my interest in why people behave and feel the way they do; no two persons with the same condition have the same experiences. Subsequent interactions with psychologically disturbed patients during a brief employment brought to light the value of connectedness with the other, which led to my pursuit in clinical psychology. The rest, as they say is history.

What are you most excited about within the evolving mental health landscape?

While there is certainly room for improvement, there seems increasing importance placed on mental health and well being in society. This evolution inspires hope that we are moving in a direction that is less stigmatising and more accepting of psychological distress, and its significance.

What do you do to continue learning and building competencies as a provider?

Attendance in training and seminars/webinars, and to keep the professional dialogue open with peers and colleagues.

What advice would you give to someone who is hesitant to try therapy?

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. It is fine, even important to be self-indulgent at times, to not deprive yourself of the space and opportunity to have someone co-regulate your distress and emotions with you.

How do your own core values shape your approach to therapy?

I believe in being authentic and kind to others, and hopefully in the process for individuals to learn to be kinder towards and gentler with themselves.